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Teachers Take in Totality

Journalism+adviser+Gina+Fosco+experienced+a+unique+affect+during+the+eclipse.++Just+before+totality+the+light+reflected+off+the+clouds+creating+a+360+degree+rainbow.++Fosco+watched+the+eclipse+on+a+family+farm+near+Pawnee+City%2C+NE.++
Journalism adviser Gina Fosco experienced a unique affect during the eclipse.  Just before totality the light reflected off the clouds creating a 360 degree rainbow.  Fosco watched the eclipse on a family farm near Pawnee City, NE.

Journalism adviser Gina Fosco experienced a unique affect during the eclipse. Just before totality the light reflected off the clouds creating a 360 degree rainbow. Fosco watched the eclipse on a family farm near Pawnee City, NE.

Tonia Albers Mannschrek

Tonia Albers Mannschrek

Journalism adviser Gina Fosco experienced a unique affect during the eclipse. Just before totality the light reflected off the clouds creating a 360 degree rainbow. Fosco watched the eclipse on a family farm near Pawnee City, NE.

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While students got out of class to watch the eclipse, two teachers took a trip into totality. On Aug. 21, teachers Gina Fosco and Sister Carol Jean VanDenHemel decided to take trips that allowed them to experience the once-in-a-lifetime event. While Sister Carol Jean viewed totality at a public library in Seward, Fosco viewed the eclipse on a small farm in Pawnee, Nebraska.

Both teachers expressed “high praise” for the eclipse.

“I was amazed at what I saw. But that was only because I was in the path of totality. It was amazing,” Sister Carol Jean said.

Fosco felt the same about the path of the totality.

“It was crazy to see how the day turned completely dark. I mean it was truly remarkable,” Fosco said.

The darkness also struck Sister Carol Jean

“It felt like the beginning of a Stephen King novel,” Sister Carol Jean said.

Although the eclipse was visible for students on campus, both teachers wanted to be in the path of totality, something they had never experienced before. It is because of being in the path of totality, in which the sun is completely covered by the moon. that Fosco’s expectations of the event were clearly met.

“I was really surprised that there is a huge difference between 99.9% of the sun being covered, and complete totality,” Fosco said.

After seeing and experiencing the event, both teachers decided to “wrap things up” and travel back home. Luckily for Sister Carol Jean, she was able to make it home easily. However, Fosco experienced the exact opposite. Traffic caused Fosco to arrive home four hours later than expected.

“Imagine having thousands of cars stopped at a stop sign,” Fosco said. “It was a lesson in patience.”

Despite dealing with traffic, both teachers spoke highly of the eclipse. When asked if she had any regrets about the trip, Fosco simply said “No, not at all.”

“I regret not bringing more family. It would have been a great sight for the family to see,” Sister Carol Jean said.

Fosco felt the same about totality, saying “It was definitely worth seeing.”

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The Online Companion to Mount Michael Student Publications
Teachers Take in Totality